WW1 Planes
WWl PLANES
An encyclopediae of 1914-18 aircraft types

flag WW1 GERMAN PLANES


Luftstreitkräfte

The German Imperial Air Force grew out of the need to put an end to frequent incursions by French observers during the first weeks of the war, which the Allied Staff greatly benefited from. This resulted from the fact that according to the Schlieffen Plan, the Germans made a vast invasion movement through the Neutral North, and that the French remained the weapon with the foot in defense. They are therefore the first to design hunters, a term also adapted to Germans in French as in English. The latter lag behind in this respect, continuing to design armed observation planes in 1915 instead of true fighters.

Rumpler C.VII circa 1918

If Germany had since 1870 some experience of ballooning thanks to pioneers of the non-motorized flight like Otto Lilienthal, or pilots trained on French equipment (Déperdussin) and a control of the airships thanks to the count Von Zeppelin, a name is obviously unavoidable in this area: Anthony Fokker. A Dutchman of origin, but living in Germany where his small monoplane devices were echoed, he soon won the contest to replace the Taube (Famous monoplane fighter who sowed terror throughout the year 1914), inspired by the Morane-Saulnier H, the Eindecker I, followed at the beginning of 1915 of the EII, and finally of the EIII, but also applied to conceive biplanes remained famous as the DI, and D.II, and especially the DR.I, first operational triplan, these devices allowing with the planes of Albatros, the great rival, to maintain the "plague Fokker", a myth of invincibility well maintained by the ace of aces, Manfred Von Richtofen. http://illustrashop.com/aileslegendaires2.com/photos_ferte/



Chance or not, many aristocrats engaged in fighter aviation, patriotic continuation of a national sport. The image of the pilot quickly became that of the "flying gentleman", and the knights of the sky. A whole romantic mythology plunged on this subject in the German middle-aged past. This domination, initiated in 1916 and continued until the beginning of 1917, began to end with the arrival of new British and French models such as Spad VII, Sopwith Camel and RAF Se.5. But the time of Aces was growing, and with Richtofen, Max Immelman, and a figure of aerobatics to which he left his name, Oswald Boelcke, the first fighter pilot, Rudolf Berthold, who did not engage until 1918 but He obtained - on Fokker D.VII - 44 authenticated victories and could have preceded Richtofen, or Verner Voss.
Fokker Dr1 This supremacy in the precocity of the hunter concept was also doubled by the adaptation in 1914, and by Fokker, of the machine gun synchronized with the propeller. This intricate mechanism that the Germans jealously guarded the secret - at least until a device was captured after a crash in the allied lines - allowed to shoot through the propeller, which gave the tractive propeller apparatus a real advantage over allied aircraft whose machine gun at the front forced to push the engine behind the pilot, or the machine gun perched on the upper wing, firing position inconvenient for the pilot. There was also the maneuverability of German aircraft, combined with a quality engine, reliable and powerful (and in this respect, the great engine manufacturers were not lacking, as Mercedes and Siemens for online engines, ensuring a good aerodynamics unlike the rarest air-cooled star motors, such as öberusel or BMW engines, and Albatros had an undeniable advantage in terms of air penetration and top speed.
Fokker Dr1 But the armistice put an end to the development of the German military aviation. Fokker was forced to return to his homeland and to civilian productions, Albatros, LFG were dissolved, as well as most of the mass-produced aircraft manufacturers, as well as Von Zeppelin himself, who for a time tried a few heavy civilian aircraft. Only Junkers, who in 1918 produced for the Jasta hunters monoplanes and all-metal assault aircraft, continued his career throughout the years twenty, thirty and forty. It was this last which allowed the German civil aviation to be constituted. More: WWI Central Powers aircraft


A.E.G. C.4

A.E.G. C.4
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Albatros D.V

Albatros D.V
Dreadful hunter if any, the Albatros D.V was the descendant of the family of D.II and D.III hunting biplanes. He was taller, more powerful and had the most aerodynamic fuselage of the time, a feat of plywood design and soft spars dressed in light wood. It was operational in April 1917 and more than 1100 copies will be built until the armistice.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 650 Kgs. In charge: 850 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 180 hp
Performance: Vmax: 190 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 300 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm hood.

Fokker D.VI

Fokker D.VI
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Fokker D.VII

Fokker D.VII
Certainly the best German fighter, and probably the best of the Great War, the D.VII had the honor of appearing in the Armistice Treaty because of the terror it inflicted on the Allied airmen. Arrived late, in November 1917, and operational in large numbers by 1918, he was superior in speed, maneuverability, power, to all that the allies possessed, Spad XIII, Sopwith Camel, SE5a ... It is only by the numerical superiority of the allies, and the reinforcement of the American pilots, that its results were diminished and that it did not tilt the control of the sky on the side of the axis. Its production continued after the war under license, Fokker having been forced to leave Germany and reconverting itself to peaceful civilian aircraft. Many were still in service around the world in the late 1920s, and even more so as converted two-seat civil aircraft.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Fokker D.VIII

Fokker D.VIII
Last Fokker fighter, released in mid-1918, the D.VIII took the solution of the high wing that had made the success of Moranes, with sufficient compactness to allow its engine to express itself fully, faster and more Solid biplane, combined speed and maneuverability were excellent and the first drivers were enthusiastic, but it came too late and too few to change the game.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Fokker DR.1

Fokker DR.1Fokker DR.1
This unique triplane "dreideker" Fokker owed its legendary reputation to the brilliance of its pilots as well as its maneuverability resulting from the excellent Sopwith Triplane, extrapolation of the Pup in 1916, which outclassed the German fighters and of which a specimen crushed, captured and recovered by Fokker was duplicated. Ace Von Richtofen, Ernst Udet and many others won most of the victories on this device, especially during the glory days of the "flying circus" that made the law in the skies of northern France in April 1917 .

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Fokker EIII

Fokker EIII
Issudes EI and EII, combat monoplanes, the first Fokker fighters were very inspired by French fighters Morane La. They had a single synchronized machine gun, which was in their advantage, and generally better performance than French planes. On the other hand, in maneuverability, it was outclassed by Nieuport XI, XII and Sopwith Pup.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Halberstadt D.II

Halberstadt D.II
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Junkers J.I

Junkers J.I
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

LFG Roland C.VI

LFG Roland C.VI
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Pfalz D.III

Pfalz D.III
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Pfalz D.XIII

Pfalz D.XIII
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.

Siemens-Schukert D.II

Siemens-Schukert D.II
This small single-engine biplane was the fruit of the company Aero E G, as an observation device armed in 1915. It was also used as a hunter because of its good performance and light bomber.

Dimensions: Wingspan: 12 m, Length 7.8 m, Height 2.65 m
Weight: empty: 750 Kgs. In charge: 930 Kgs.
Motorization: 1 Mercedes-Benz 43 of 150 hp
Performance: Vmax: 130 km / h at 2000 m, ceiling 4000 m, RA 600 km.
Armament: 2 mitt. Rheinmetall 7.9 mm wing and rear station, 60 Kgs. bombs.