WW1 Planes
WWl PLANES
An encyclopediae of 1914-18 aircraft types

flag FOKKER

Fokker had two faces, it is remembered as a long-lived Dutch transportation company, but also during the first world war, Germany's premium fighters manufacturers, which legendary models were flown by the best pilots of the era, imposing their domination over the western front and beyond.

Origins

This Dutch aircraft manufacturer took a very special place in aviation history. On its time, it was the largest, most successful aircraft manufacturer worldwide, living up to 1996 and meeting bankruptcy, but leaving an amazing imprint in many areas nonetheless. Interestingly enough, the company was founded in 1912 in Schwerin, Germany by Anthony Fokker, and for what we are concern for, moving to the Netherlands in 1919 to escape sanctions and convert back to the civilian market, dominating it completely in the 1920s and 1930s. Indeed the 1925 F.VIIa/3m trimotor passenger aircraft was used by 54 airline companies worldwide and got 40% of the American market in 1936.
Anthony Fokker in his first Spin 1908
Anthony Fokker in his first Spin 1908

German Fokkers: Ruling the skies (1915-1918)

Anthony Fokker was Dutch but studied in Germany, well aware of the works of Lilienthal and others. He has created the Spin (spider) in the Netherlands, but found better opportunity and Germany and moved there. In Berlin he created the Fokker Aeroplanbau, later relocated southwest of Schwerin for more room, and eventually settled with Fokker Aviatik GmbH, on 12 February 1912. After a serie of Fokker Spin monoplanes tried by hte German government, he proposed an improved copy of the French Morane-Saulnier G which became the Fokker M.5. This monoplane was used for obervation with some modifications like the outline of the rudder, undercarriage and new aerofoil section.

Eindecker When it was realized observation planes already fought each other with any possible ways, Fokker quickly realized placing a machine-gun on the hood was the best solution, using the 1913 patented Swiss Franz Schneider synchronization system, way more practical and safer than Roland Garros own armoured propeller solution... Thus was born the first "Fokker scourge", from July 1915 until early 1916. It was bring up by the famous Fokker Eindecker or "monoplane". The first flew on 23 May 1915, it was a modified M.5 A.16/15 flown by Otto Parschau, and a total of 416 were built. The first tactics were devised with this plane, the first aces all flew it. Allies felt a strong inferiority complex from then on, until the arrival of the Nieuport 11 and Airco DH.2.

Fokker K.1

Fokker engineered another observation plane, single-bay sesquiplane two-seats built to around 20 powered by 60 kW (80 hp) Oberursel U.0 rotary engine, used by the Kaiserliche Marine and Austro-Hungaria. The Fokker A.1 also called M.8 was another observation plane, but two-seats monoplane developed in early 1915 which enjoyed better production. The next observation model was the M.10Z also used by Austro-Hungary under the name B.II. But the bulk of the production went to the E series, from the E.I to the E.IV.

Fokker M.16

There was one attempt to devise a two-seat prototype with a particular fuselage linking both upper and lower wings, but a small production of the M.16Z took place for Austro-Hungary with the 119 kW (160 hp) Mercedes engine or Austro-Daimler. under the M.16E as the B.3. At least with the D.II Fokker unveiled a capable fighter biplane dervived from the B.7 in 1916 but having only a 75 kW (100 hp) Oberursel U.I meant it was slow and underpowered. The Army purchased 177.

The D.I was in the same vein, it was an unstaggered single-bay, or Einstielig equal-span biplane, using a more potent liquid-cooled Mercedes D.I six-cylinder in-line engine. But it was still not enough to best Nieuport 11, or at least being equal to the the Albatros D.II and production was stopped. The next Fokker D.II, III and IV had the same production but the D.V gave Anthony Fokker the best hopes. It was cheaper, lighter and smaller, but still lacked performances compared to the Albatros.

Fokker D.I, used also by Austro-Hungary and Turkey

By early 1917 Fokker was in deep troubles. The army paid successive series of its D series, but performances were still not there to climb in the prized top best fighters a position lost since the E series. Even pilots were not impressed and preferred the Albatros and AEGs. But this phase left Fokker testing new solutions, and especially four prototypes, the second and third returning to the 89 kW (120 hp) Mercedes liquid-cooled inline engine, for better performances, and compensate for the engine weight, the center of gravity was placed further back, and the fuselage was circular in cross section, the wings being covered with plywood for extra rigidity. But both were still too slow to earn their fighter title. However for the Fokker V.4 this was a completely new start.

Fokker V.4,the blueprint for the DR.I

Perhaps short of ideas, Anthony Fokker decided to have a close look on the successful British Inspired by the successful Sopwith Triplane, just introduced. This time, Reinhold Platz was responsible for the design, and conceived around the small Oberusel a very light airframe with steel tubes inspired by Junkers's work (The result of government-mandated collaboration) and there three cantilever wings, the upper one having a slightly larger span.

The rudder was balanced, but the ailerons and elevators lacked horn balances and at that stage there were no interplane struts. It was further developed as the F.I or V.5, an improved version with still lacked a subtle convex curve on the outlines of the tailplane's leading edge platform. In fact three of these V.5 experimental serie were built, ending with the amazing Dr.I for "Dreidecker". On 14 July 1917, Idflieg issued an order for 20 pre-production aircraft.

Fokker Dr.1 in Jasta 26 at Erchin, France

The Fokker Dr.I was the first return to an absolute winner since the infamous Eindecker. It was mid-1917 and the Dr.1 bring the company again in the first seat. But the fearful triplane, soon made legendary by some aces for its unreal, impossible feats of agility took some time to reach this level, in the end of 1917. From then on, the Dr.1 dominated the skies over Europe, largely contributed to the second allied eclipse. Richthofen first flew the preserie F1 number 102 on 1 September 1917 and all only praised for it. It was introduced in Jasta 10 ad 11 but on 15 September Leutnant Werner Voss was killed in one of the most earth-shaking last stand and dogfight in history.

Fokker V.8

Above: The V.8 was an attempt to devise a "Quintuplane", a five-wings variant which shocked Reinhold Platz, chief engineer for Fokker, which designed it, partly made of the V.6 and it was powered by a 120 hp (90 kW) water-cooled Mercedes engine. Anthony tested it despite Platz objections, which only confirmed his early opinion and the whole project was abandoned, later qualified as a monstrosity. What followed was a serie of experimental aircrafts using the same Dr.I cell but various engine and wings configurations. The serie comprised the V.9, V.11, V.12, V.13. V.14, V.16. The last V.33 development from the V.9 with both 82 kW (110 hp) and 108 kW (145 hp) Oberursel engines. All these prepared the ground for the arrival of the D.VI, a brand new biplane fighter.

Fokker D.VI

This model, which was soon eclipsed by the next fighter was developed from the prototype serie V.13. The idea was to marry the scaled-down D.VII wings with both the fuselage and empennage of the Dr.I. two prototypes with different engines were presented at the Adlershof fighter trials in late January 1918, and it was approved on the ground it was cheaper than the model VII and certainly the best of the rotary engine models. In fact only a token production of 59 was done, the Idflieg waiting for the more powerful Goebel Goe.III to arrive. Meanwhile, the new plane has to make due with the old Oberursel Ur.II. Deliveries lasted from April to August 1918, but the small biplane stood no chance. What followed were the Fokker V17-25 prototypes, cantilever mid-winged fighter and assimilated features.

Fokker D.VII

The Fokker D.VIII was the last wartime fighter, a parasol fighter which first flew in May 1918. About 380 were built until the end of the war, but in fact few made it on the front. They had been designed based on the V.26 and V.28, with steel-tube fuselages and Obersusel radial engines, rated for 150 and 160 hp. In fact they were quite agile and small, therefore quite fast, only beaten by a feeble margin by the more powerful and costly Siemens-Schuckert D.III using a complex bi-rotary Siemens-Halske Sh.III engine.

Introduction started in late July with Jasta 6 in late July and August-September for the Jasta 1, Jasta 19, Jasta 24 and Jasta 36. Until November they filled impressive hunt boards despite wing failures and rushed construction problems. After the war many made it in the Royal Netherlands Air Force and other foughts with Polish pilots in 1920.

The next V27 prototype fighters testes liquid-cooled Benz engines, while the V37 had additional armour-plating to be used as a ground-attack variant. The last production model was the large Fokker C.I, a two-seats, enlarged version of the D.VII fighter. About 250 were made until the last day of the war, largely used after it with the Dutch and Danish aviations.

Fokker D.VIII

Models

The story of Fokker development is interesting. The company specialized quite quickly on fighters after a serie of observation monoplanes and a few biplanes, with mixed success. In fact, it was unique in having all its three top fighters - and arguably each time the very best on offer - representing all three types of wings configuration: Monoplane (E serie), Triplane (Dr.I) and Biplane (D.VII).

Production runs were limited, until the arrival of the D.VII which was imposed industrially to all German manufacturers to stand a chance when facing the Entente industrial figures, way above until then. If the E was responsible for the first "Fokker scourge" the Dr.1 legendary agility soon cleaned up any opposition, while the D.VII, late in the war, was as fast and powerful as it was still agile and certainly won by agreement of most experts the conveyed title of "best fighter of WW1".

Proof of that was the particularly long production run and wide use of the model after the war, and a long lineage that followed -as the company name's fame- in the interwar. The best dogfighter overall title could have been given to the Dr.I, but the D.VIII war aguably as agile, being much faster as well.
  • Fokker Spin (About 5-6 prototypes) 1913 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_Spin
  • Fokker M.5 Obervation plane (A.II, A.III) 1914 - 50?
  • Fokker M.6 (prototype 1914)
  • Fokker Eindecker 1915 - 450
  • Fokker M.7/10 observation 1915 (Austro-Hungarian B.I) - 20 built
  • Fokker A.I (M.8) 1915 - 63-85
  • Fokker K.I/M.9 twin push-pull engines, twin boom prototype 1915
  • Fokker M.10 Observation about 30 1916
  • Fokker M.16 two-seat fighter 1916 - 10
  • Fokker D.II fighter 1916 - 177
  • Fokker D.I fighter 1916 - 144
  • Fokker D.III fighter 1916 - 210
  • Fokker D.IV fighter 1916 - 44
  • Fokker D.V fighter 1916 - 216
  • Fokker V1-3 parasol fighter 1916
  • Fokker V4 triplane fighter prototype 1917
  • Fokker V5 or F.I preserie 1917
  • Fokker Dr.I 1917 - 320
  • Fokker V.6, V.7 Dr.I prototypes
  • Fokker V.8 1917 quintuplane prototype
  • Fokker V.9 - V.33 various biplane fighter prototypes 1917-18
  • Fokker D.VI 1918 - 59
  • Fokker D.VII 1918 - 3300
  • Fokker V17-25 - Series of experimental aircrafts
  • Fokker D.VIII - 381 (1918)
  • Fokker V.27 – V.37 prototypes
  • Fokker C.I (1918) 250

Fokker models

Fokker M.5

before the Eindecker Serie, there was the M.5 - Here is the the prototype - picture probably taken in 1913

This unarmed single-seat monoplane defined in 1913 was one of many German's reconnaissance aircraft that existed, all shadowed by the bird-like Etrich Taube. Anthony's design never went from far away, he closely watched the French Morane-Saulnier H, shoulder-wing monoplane, for inspiration. However the fuselage he designed had a welded steel tube frame in place of a wooden structure, and it was propelled by an honest 60 kW (80 hp) Oberursel U.0 7-cylinder rotary engine. The latter was a licence-built Gnome Lambda. The tail and elevators were all-moving, without fixed sections.

Soon two versions were developed:
-The long-span 'M.5L' Produced as Fokker A.I , ? built
-The short-span 'M.5K' Produced as Fokker A.III 10 built
The "L" was for long, "K" meant "short" or Kurz in German.
-The MG-armed 'M.5K/MG' 5 built
-The 'M.6' Two-seats version
-The 'M.7' Two-seats version, 20 built
-The 'M.8' 2 side-by-side seaters, produced as Fokker A.II
-The 'W.3/4' Floats-fitted version
-The short-span 'M.5K'
The Fokker M.5 was a light and strong, very agile plane to the point of being used for aerobatics but it should be noticed, capricious for its very sensitive fore-and-aft control, and Fokker, still young and dashing, demonstrated his plane's abilities Johannisthal in May and June 1914, winning awards in the process and interest from the German staff.

The German army ordered the "long" M.5L, manufactured by Halberstadt under the 'A.II' designation. The 'M.8' two-seater also entered service as the 'A.I'. These served on the Western and Eastern Fronts in an in early 1915, ten M.5Ks were ordered as 'A.III', of which five received a single 7.92 mm (.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine gun for testings. They were later modified as the famous Fokker E.I. This plane was also used by Austria-Hungary.
Specifications:
-Length/Wingspan: 7.2 m x 9.2m (23 ft 7 in x 31 ft 2 in)
-Empty weight: 399 kg (880 lb), Gross weight: 610 kg (1,345 lb)
-Powerplant: Oberursel U.0 7-cylinder rotary piston engine, 60 kW (80 hp)
-Performances: 130 km/h (81 mph; 70 kn), Service ceiling: 3,000 m (9,800 ft)
-Armament (only the five M5K/MG): 7.92 mm (0.312 in) MG 14 Spandau machine gun

Fokker Eindecker

Fokker E.1
Fokker E.1

The fearful "E" was the first purpose-built German fighter aircraft. It was also the first worldwide to be fitted with a synchronization gear. This enabled the pilot aim the plane without leaving his position, firing through the propeller arc without striking the blades. The "E" for Eindecker or monoplane, bring overnight to the German military air superiority approximatively from July 1915 to early 1916 a period later known as the "Fokker Scourge".

The Eindecker was based as we seen before on the M.5K scout or modified Fokker A.III based on the French Morane-Saulnier H. The fuselage however used chrome-molybdenum steel tubing instead of wood and crucially it was given the Fokker synchronizer mechanism used for the MG14 machine gun to fire through the propeller. Anthony Fokker for the anecdote towed the prototype aircraft behind his touring car to the military airfield near Berlin on 23 May 1915 and flew it.

The prototype was alloted the serial number A.16/15 by Leutnant Otto Parschau and previously had been pruchased by Oberleutnant Waldemar von Buttlar which painted it green. He personally tested the synchonizer in May and June 1915 at Douai with Feldflieger Abteilung 62 and helpd correct the mechanism. These tests helped to define the M.5K/MG on which the Eindecker was based. Parchau's second Eindecker was serialized number 191, and accepted by IdFlieg on May 26, 1915.

One unmistakable aspect if the planes were their sheet metal panelling, a special form of "dragged" engine turning performed on all metal surfaces, even internal ones. This finish was only dropped by the end of 1916. other specifics included a gravity fuel tank that had to be constantly filled by hand-pumping from the main tank up to eight times an hour. The aerodynamically balanced rudder and elevator, ans no tail surfaces made the Eindecker very responsive to pitch and yaw and tricky for beginners. But that was also the trademark of a true fighter, despite on the other hand having a poor roll, the result of wing-warping. In total, 416 of these fighter will be delivered, through four main variants E.I to E.IV.

The Eindecker E.II to E.IV The E.I was the initial serie, a production armed scout powered by a 80hp Oberursel U.0 rotary engine, 68 of which were built. With the Fokker E.II, the term "fighter" was more appropriate, as this improved production armed scout was powered by a 100hp Oberursel U.I rotary engine. 49 were built. Both series were almost "pre-series", compared to the following E.III, major production still powered by the same 100hp Oberursel U.I but with improved structure and equipment.

249 were delivered total. With the last version E.IV, the fuselage was slightly enlarged to accommodate a 14-cyl. Oberursel U.III engine but moreover two machine guns above the engine hood instead of one, a decidedly marked firepower improvement. 49 were built of this last version.

Immelmann's own Eindecker The Allies soon realized the advantages of the Eindecker when on 8 April 1916, a young pilot landed at a British aerodrome near St Omer, and tried, but failed to destroy his aircraft. The plane was repaired and soon tested against the Morane-Saulnier N and other types. This one ended in the Science Museum in London while Immelmann's own E.13/15 is now displayed at Dresden.

The Eindecker E.I rules the skies Entering service in the summer of 1915, the E.I obtained a first unconfirmed aerial victory on Leutnant Wintgens's own M5K/MG on 1 July 1915 near Lunéville, against a Morane L. Another Morane was forced to land, and at last a credited victory was registered on 15 July 1915. organically these planes were to be attached to provide escort protection for six two-seat reconnaissance biplanes.

But soon in August, Oswald Boelcke and Max Immelmann (Feldflieger Abteilung 62) rose to fame in August. The first scored 19 victories on the "E" out of 40. Max Immelmann which also devizsed his famous tactics won all his victories on this plane, before being killed in June 1916 on his E.III, perhaps because a synchonizer failure. Eleven more pilots became aces on the E series and in addition to the two top aces mentioned, Parschau and Wintgens also received Germany's highest military award, "Pour le Mérite"/"Blue Max".

Domination soon ended when the Airco DH.2, Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2, and French Nieuport 11 soon appaeard superior or at least equal to the challenge. However some pilots were attached to the Eindeckers to such a point they flew it until late 1916, as shown by the duel between Alfred Heurteaux's SPAD VII which eventually shot Wintgens's own E.IV on September 25, 1916.



Specifications (E.III):
-Length: 7.2 x 9.52 x 2.4 m (23 ft 7 in x 31 ft 3 in x 7 ft 10 in)
-Empty weight: 399 kg (880 lb), Gross weight: 610 kg (1,345 lb)
-Crew: 1
-Powerplant: Oberursel U.I 9-cyl.air-cooled rotary piston engine, 75 kW (100 hp) -Performances: 140 km/h (87 mph; 76 kn) Endurance 1.5 hours, ceiling 3,600 m (11,810 ft), climb: 3.333 m/s
-Armament: One 7.92 mm (0.312 in) lMG 08 Spandau machine gun (two on the E.IV)

Fokker M.7

Fokker M.7
Fokker B.I/M.7 photo http://forum.valka.cz/files/fokker_bim7_02_623.jpg

The Fokker M.7 was a single-bay sesquiplane of conventional configuration. There were slightly staggered wings using wing warping for roll control. It was a two-seater fitted with a distinctive comma-shaped rudder. It was powered by a 60 kW (80 hp) Oberursel U.0 rotary engine. Twenty of these observation planes were delivered. A few to Kaiserliche Marine for their shore stations. They aso tested the The W.3/W.4 floatplane version. This plane was also operated by the Austro-Hungarian forces designated B.I, after Idflieg designation system.

Specifications:
-Length: 9.9 m (32 ft 6 in), Wingspan: 14.3 m (46 ft 11 in), Height: 3.2 m (10 ft 6 in), Wing area: 32.5 m2 (350 sq ft)
-Empty weight: 650 kg (1,433 lb), Gross weight: 850 kg (1,874 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 100 km/h (62 mph; 54 kn), Range: 140 km (87 mi; 76 nmi), Service ceiling: 2,000 m (6,600 ft)
-Armament: Rifles, pistols and hand dropped bombs.

Fokker A.I

Fokker A.I
This Fokker A.I (M.8) photo was previously in Flickr coll. of San Diego Air & Space Museum, now on wikimedia commons

The Fokker A.I (Fokker factory designation M.8) was an unarmed two-seat monoplane observation aircraft (A-class) of 1914. It took its origine before the war, when a Morane-Saulnier Type H was purchased from France and studied to create the whole "A" lineage. This observation monoplane designed by Martin Kreutzer was powered by the 58.8 kW (80 PS) Oberursel U.0 seven cylinder rotary engine. Also called umlaufmotor this widespread engine was a near-clone of the Gnome Lambda rated for the same power output. It was used until the introduction of the E.II in 1915.

The A.I was related to the Fokker M.5, largely flown in aerobatics before the war. It had a tall dorsal "cabane" structure for three sets of stationary flying and landing wires. Each wing panel had fourteen ribs, for the same number of wing warping cables attached to the rear spar. The A.I was licence-built by Halberstadt in addition to Fokker to about 63 planes. It was used by the Fliegertruppe, Kaiserliche Marine's Marine-Fliegerabteilung and Austro-Hungarian K.u.K. Luftfahrtruppen.

Specifications:
-Length: 7.54 x 12.12 x 2.75 m (24 ft 9 in x 39 ft 9 in x 9 ft 0 in), wing area: 32.5 m2 (350 sq ft)
-Crew: 1
-Powerplant: Oberursel U.0, 58.8 kW (80 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 135 km/h (84 mph), Range: 400 km (249 miles), Service ceiling: 3,000 m (9,840 ft)
-Armament: None.

Fokker M.10

Fokker M.10
Fokker M.10

This two-seater reconnaissance/fighter-trainer biplane had single-bay wings fitted with wing-warping controls. It was powered by a 7-cylinder 80 hp Oberursel U.0 engine and was exclusively flown by the Austro-Hungarian aviation: The Imperial and Royal Aviation Troops or Kaiserliche und Königliche Luftfahrtruppen/K.u.K. Luftfahrtruppen. Lacking aircraft production capacity the Empire indeed purchased this model in Germany in 1916, and in two versions, single-bay wings (M 10E or "Einstielig" or Fokker B.I), and two-bay wings Fokker M 10Z ("Zweistielig"), or Fokker B.II).

The first was powered by an 60 kW (80 hp) Oberursel U.0 7-cylinder rotary engine. It was based on the Fokker M 7 from 1915 with a revised and strengthened undercarriage and centre section struts. First delivery occurred in April 1916 and the next 19 aircraft in August 1916 and last 3 in September 1916 because of engines supplies limitations. They served as unarmed trainers until the end of the war.
Specifications:
-Length: 6.20 x 7.20 x 2.71 m (20 ft 4 in x 23 ft 7 in x 8 ft 11 in)
-Empty weight: 274 kg (604 lb) Gross weight: 481 kg (1,060 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: Oberursel U.0 7-cyl. air-cooled rotary piston engine, 60 kW (80 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 130 km/h (81 mph)
-Armament: None.

Fokker D.II

Fokker D.II
Fokker D.II



The Fokker D.II was a fighter biplane, single-seat developed before the Fokker D.I, based on the M.17 prototype. it was given single-bay unstaggered wings, a larger fuselage, shorter span. It was also given a 75 kW (100 hp) Oberursel U.I and a the single 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08 machine gun. 177 were purchased but proved to be only marginally better than the Eindecker, and totally outclassed by the Nieuport 17 in the end. A few were used by the Kampfeinsitzerkommandos and Jagdstaffeln but they were all discarded when the new Albatros were introduced. After the war they found their way into the Koninklijke Marine and Swiss Air Force.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.40 x 8.75 x 2.55 m (21 ft 0 in x 28 ft 9 in x 8 ft 4 in)
-Empty weight: 384 kg (847 lb) Gross weight: 575 kg (1,268 lb)
-Crew: 1
-Powerplant: Oberursel U.I rotary, 75 kW (100 hp)
-Performances: 150 km/h (93 mph), Range 200 km (124 miles), ceiling is 4,000 m (13,125 ft), climb in 4.2 m/s (820 ft/min)
-Armament: 7.92 mm (.312 in) lMG 08 machine gun

Fokker D.I

Fokker D.I
Fokker D.I

The Fokker D.I (M.18) was developed from the D.II fighter and later used by the Austro-Hungarians as the B.III. The D.I and D.II were both introduced in the summer of in 1916, both designed by Martin Kreutzer. This model was an unstaggered single-bay equal-span biplane using wing-warping for roll and fitted with the 75 kW (100 hp) Mercedes D.I six-cylinder water-cooled engine. A twin-bay (Zweistielig) was also tried to improve visibility.

The latter was given a 89 kW (120 hp) Mercedes D.II inline engine but also a single synchronized 7.92 mm (.312 in) lMG 08 machine gun, while the Austro-Hungarian B.IIIs was still fitted with the D.I engine, but replaced the armament by a local Schwarzlose machine gun. Another Austro-Hungarian B III also tested a 119 kW (160 hp) Mercedes D.III engine and there were other aerodynamic modifications tested.

In July 1916 the production started, 90 being taken in account by the German Fliegertruppen, and 16 by the Austro-Hungarian Luftfahrttruppen. 8 more were also license-built by the Magyar Általános Gépgyár for the Hungarian air force. But these planes compared badly to the contemporary Albatros D.II and the Nieuport 11 and production was halted.
Specifications:
-Length: 9.9 m (32 ft 6 in), Wingspan: 14.3 m (46 ft 11 in), Height: 3.2 m (10 ft 6 in), Wing area: 32.5 m2 (350 sq ft)
-Empty weight: 650 kg (1,433 lb), Gross weight: 850 kg (1,874 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 100 km/h (62 mph; 54 kn), Range: 140 km (87 mi; 76 nmi), Service ceiling: 2,000 m (6,600 ft)
-Armament: Rifles, pistols and hand dropped bombs.

Fokker D.III

Fokker D.III
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.III



Specifications:
-Length: 9.9 m (32 ft 6 in), Wingspan: 14.3 m (46 ft 11 in), Height: 3.2 m (10 ft 6 in), Wing area: 32.5 m2 (350 sq ft)
-Empty weight: 650 kg (1,433 lb), Gross weight: 850 kg (1,874 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 100 km/h (62 mph; 54 kn), Range: 140 km (87 mi; 76 nmi), Service ceiling: 2,000 m (6,600 ft)
-Armament: Rifles, pistols and hand dropped bombs.

Fokker D.IV

Fokker D.IV
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.IV

This model used a more powerful Mercedes D.III engine, and the first Fokker front-line design to use ailerons in place of wing warping from the start for roll control. 40 were used by the Luftstreitkrafte and 4 by the Swedish air force.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Fokker D.V

Fokker D.V G.81 in 1916
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.V Fokker D.V

following the disappointing D.I and the following serie up to the D.IV, Fokker designed a smaller, lighter design to use simpler and cheaper rotary engine. The new M.21 prototype was developed from the Austro-Hungarian M.17 fighter but this M.21 had a swept back upper wing, notably to improve pilot view, and it proved highly maneuverable.

After a modified cowling and stringers to renforce the fuselage the M.22 flew again and won an order from the Idflieg In October 1916. This production model D.V would engine the largest production run so far sine the E serie, and started with a low-compression Oberursel U.I in January 1917, 216 being turned in all. However pilots esteemed it presented much lower performances than contemporary Albatros series and soon joined schools from late 1917.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Fokker Dr.I

Fokker Dr.I
Dr.I reproduction at Airpower 11 airshow. probably the most famous German fighter of that era

ùmmùùm.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_Dr.I

Dr.I reproduction at Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome Dr.I reproduction at Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Dr.I blueprints

Fokker D.VI

Fokker D.IV
Fokker D.VI

This model used a more powerful Mercedes D.III engine, and the first Fokker front-line design to use ailerons in place of wing warping from the start for roll control. 40 were used by the Luftstreitkrafte and 4 by the Swedish air force.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Fokker D.VII

Fokker D.IV


This model used a more powerful Mercedes D.III engine, and the first Fokker front-line design to use ailerons in place of wing warping from the start for roll control. 40 were used by the Luftstreitkrafte and 4 by the Swedish air force.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Fokker D.VIII

Fokker D.IV
Fokker D.VIII

This model used a more powerful Mercedes D.III engine, and the first Fokker front-line design to use ailerons in place of wing warping from the start for roll control. 40 were used by the Luftstreitkrafte and 4 by the Swedish air force.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Fokker C.I

Fokker C.I
Fokker C.I

This model used a more powerful Mercedes D.III engine, and the first Fokker front-line design to use ailerons in place of wing warping from the start for roll control. 40 were used by the Luftstreitkrafte and 4 by the Swedish air force.

Specifications:
-Length: 6.3 x 9.7 x 2.45m (10 ft 10 in x 31 ft 10 in x 8 ft)
-Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb) Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
-Crew: 2
-Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes Typ E4F[12] 4-cyl. water-cooled piston engine, 64 kW (86 hp)
-Performances: Max speed: 160 km/h (99 mph), range: 220 km (137 miles), rate of climb: 5.6 m/s
-Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns